[Baddie Winkle] The Epitome of Style

Baddie Winkle’s life is a Cinderella story. Except substitute the fairy-tale ball gown with punchy neon lips, green hair, club kid sequins and a cigarette; the white mice with 1.7 million Instagram followers (bio: “stealing your man since 1928”); and the carriage with a high-speed jet, transporting her worldwide for appearances and photo shoots, including Paper Magazine and a 12-page spread in Galore. Miley Cyrus has proclaimed her a style icon, and with good reason. Baddie (née Helen Ruth Van Winkle) is blowing up the fashion world with her audacious, no-holds-barred, age-defying approach to style.

“Confidence is everything to me. It is who I am and who I have always been. You have to own your identity and embrace you for you. You have to love yourself no matter what others think of you. It’s all in the way you carry and believe in yourself.

BADDIE WINKLE

“I do love colourful clothes, I don’t wear too much black or anything like that. I love being in LA, because most of the time I’m doing shoots and things, but I also get to have my hair and makeup done and that makes me feel fabulous.

“I never take a break or breather. I have never sat down and said ‘Oh I am so old, I can’t do this anymore.’ It has never crossed my mind. I just keep going. People think, ‘I’m 50, I won’t get to model anymore.’ Well, that’s not true. All they have to do is keep on keeping on.

“I am embracing who I am even more so in my 80s. I have always been stylish; I just developed a more ‘out there’ attitude. I guess you could say I am living the dream of wearing what I want and not worrying about other people’s impressions. As I say, ‘Live and let live.’ I will wear what makes me feel fabulous and others can wear what makes them feel the same way. What does ‘age appropriate’ really mean? I mean, does it really apply to me or anyone else in this world? My opinion is they need to throw out that term, period. Who am I to judge others on what they wear? I think we only have one judge in this world, and I’d say he is ok with my dressing selections.

“I love Miley Cyrus. I think we think alike. I’ve only met her once and talked with her, and she was great. I like her style. I can see where she’s coming from, being younger and always on TV and she had to change herself. She’s a little wild of course, but that’s fine. That’s Miley. I guess I’m a little wild once in a while myself!

“Embrace your inner being in every way possible. It’s ok to get old. You don’t have to sit in a chair and watch the news. Enjoy your older years. These can be some of the best years of your life. Enjoy music festivals. Go out and experience all the things you were always afraid to try because you were afraid of what your family or friends would think. Live your life for yourself now. For years I, too, tried to do what my family thought was best for me. Now I just do it and don’t ask permission from anyone. I am the one who has to ultimately answer to my actions and myself. Have fun!”

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[Review] Revista Ego: “Dime que usas y te diré quién eres” Aisha Naomi en Juntos en la Mañana por Wapa

Thank you egomoda.com for the shout out! I was so excited to see an article on the site since they were part of my beginnings in the fashion industry. I’m totally humbled that my clients are proud to have me in control of their image and trust me blindly on a daily basis. Also, my agency Grandes Eventos PR for their constant hard work.  My business partner and colleague Naomy Quiñones  for her support; I can’t wait for what the rest of the year holds!

egomoda

Photo by Naomy Quiñones (C)

For more on this post and article click on the [Jump].

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[Fashion History] Heels for “Juntos En La Mañana”

High-heeled shoes are a type of footwear exclusively to women. However, history shows us that it wasn’t always so.  Actually, these were worn by men in different historical periods. In addition, while today we use heels for aesthetic reasons in the past they were used because of their practicality. Although it is unclear where did the first heels came from, but it seems that  they were first worn by actors in ancient Greece. These were called “kothornoi” and it was a type of shoe that was used around the second century BC. these were made ​​with cork and wooden soles and were as high to 3 and 4 inches.

It is also said that during the Middle Ages in Europe, men and women used them due to the dirty and muddy streets, in that time period shoes were extremely delicate and expensive. To avoid damaging them, they wore heels.

A “chopine” was a type of footwear worn mostly by women and extremely popular in Venetian society during the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries. Besides their practical uses, their height became a symbolic reference to the cultural and social standing of the wearer; the higher the “chopine”, the higher the status of the wearer. During the Renaissance, these became an essential  piece in women’s fashion; some were over 20 inches high. They were not at all practical and easy to walk in, so they needed servants to help them maintain their balance.

Heeled shoes were also used for many centuries in the Middle East as footwear for soldiers. This helped them cling to their stirrups on their horses and they could shoot their arrows more accurately.

During the 1630s women wore short hair and epaulettes. They smoked pipes and wore hats that were very masculine in designs. For this reason women began to wear heels, it was an effort to masculinize their wardrobe. During this period, the European upper class adopted unisex style shoes until the end of the seventeenth century. At the end of the period a change began to occur in the style of heels. Men began using squared off, robust and lower heels, while women wore a much more slender and curved style.

During this period women were considered emotional, sentimental and with uneducated views. The began what was considered irrational fashion trends and high heels were now separated from its role in horsemanship and became a typical example of unpractical fashion; these were seen as silly and effeminate.

During the 1740’s until now men stopped using heels, but right after the French Revolution women had stopped wearing them also. Heels were used again by the mid-nineteenth century, when photography began to change the way fashion and women viewed themselves.

[L to R] Griselle Mamery, Aisha Naomi

[L to R] Griselle Mamery, Aisha Naomi

Check out my latest fashion segment on  WAPA TV & WAPA America: [Dime que usas y te dire quien eres] ¿Cómo surgen los tacos?

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